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  #1  
Old 12-25-2006, 06:00 PM
FXstrongSide FXstrongSide is offline
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Can I rebuild my shocks using motor oil?

Just what the title says does it make a difference then rebuilding the shocks with shock oil?
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  #2  
Old 12-25-2006, 06:05 PM
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Feasibly, yes it can be used. Matter of fact, some, if not all, manufacturers use a petroleum based oil for their RTRs. The main reason for using silicone based fluids, ie: shock oil, is simply that the viscosities are more stable under fluctuating temperatures. One other thing to consider, the "motor oil" probably isn't as o-ring friendly as typical silicone shock fluids.
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Old 12-25-2006, 06:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LD3Furious
Feasibly, yes it can be used. Matter of fact, some, if not all, manufacturers use a petroleum based oil for their RTRs. The main reason for using silicone based fluids, ie: shock oil, is simply that the viscosities are more stable under fluctuating temperatures. One other thing to consider, the "motor oil" probably isn't as o-ring friendly as typical silicone shock fluids.
isnt one of the major points of oil in and engine is to lubricate and rejuvinate the seals/ o rings? i think its a great idea, ALOT CHEAPER
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Old 12-25-2006, 06:11 PM
FXstrongSide FXstrongSide is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LD3Furious
Feasibly, yes it can be used. Matter of fact, some, if not all, manufacturers use a petroleum based oil for their RTRs. The main reason for using silicone based fluids, ie: shock oil, is simply that the viscosities are more stable under fluctuating temperatures. One other thing to consider, the "motor oil" probably isn't as o-ring friendly as typical silicone shock fluids.
I won't ruin anything right? I also can dump it out to put shock oil in later?
BTW I am doing this in a savage x and am thinking about going with 40 weight.
Sound about right?
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Old 12-25-2006, 06:28 PM
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If you are using stock RUBBER O-rings, as I understand it, they will breakdown in time from the petroleum-based oil as-opposed to silicone O-rings. If you have some silicone O-rings, I say go for it
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Old 12-25-2006, 07:24 PM
FXstrongSide FXstrongSide is offline
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I just rebuilt my entire shock setup with 10W 30 and it is great thanks to all that replied.
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Old 12-26-2006, 12:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FXstrongSide
I just rebuilt my entire shock setup with 10W 30 and it is great thanks to all that replied.
LOL! I have a quart of that 'round here somewhere. Maybe I'll try it. Innovative to say the least.
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Old 12-26-2006, 04:42 AM
one85_db one85_db is offline
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I did it in my Bandit and it worked fine with 10w30. It does tend to leak more however, and the motor oils are much thinner than silicon based oils. The other thing i noticed is that the motor oil bubbled more inside the shock decreasing effectiveness on long runs.

BTW my shocks were a little worn at the time which could have increaced the ineffectiveness. another thing to remember is that motor oil can be conductive while silicone is insinuative.
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Old 12-26-2006, 11:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by one85_db
another thing to remember is that motor oil can be conductive while silicone is insinuative.
I'm lost on that one. Help me out. I understand that silicone isn't conductive, but is motor conductive enough to be a concern in RC?
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Old 12-26-2006, 12:00 PM
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Hmmm....electrical short = exploding shocks?
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Old 12-26-2006, 12:05 PM
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^^

I've been using stuff other than silicone shock oil for a long time now. I never really bother to buy shock oil, because usually by the time I need to rebuild the shocks or change the fluid, the shocks need to be tuned differently because I found a different place to drive the truck.

I just use anything liquid and somewhat viscous that's laying around the house, i.e., water , dishwasher fluid (for hard shocks), etc

I've had no ill effects from using these types of things yet - basically I just go by this - if you can theoretically put some on your hand and it doesnt burn you or is toxic, it will work fine.

Dave
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Old 12-26-2006, 12:44 PM
FXstrongSide FXstrongSide is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neon_Dave
^^

I just use anything liquid and somewhat viscous that's laying around the house, i.e., water , dishwasher fluid (for hard shocks), etc


Dishwasher soap thats pretty intense
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Old 12-26-2006, 01:34 PM
rocknbil rocknbil is offline
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The only problem with automotive oil is you don't have as fine a control over viscosity, that is, the silicone oils come in weights of 5 apart. The motor oil what have you got, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 weight? If you're filling your shocks properly, it makes a difference.
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Old 12-26-2006, 07:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rocknbil
The only problem with automotive oil is you don't have as fine a control over viscosity, that is, the silicone oils come in weights of 5 apart. The motor oil what have you got, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 weight? If you're filling your shocks properly, it makes a difference.
I am using 10W 30 motor oil. I picked up some Team Losi 37 and 1/2 weight shock oil. I also picked up some HPI silicone O-Rings for the shocks.
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Old 12-26-2006, 11:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FXstrongSide
Dishwasher soap thats pretty intense
Here's the catch - it's of the "sensitive skin" variety

Works good so far... nice and viscous, makes for some hard shocks, just the way I like 'em Shock oil is undoubtebly better, however, but if you've got nothing else available...
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Old 12-27-2006, 12:06 AM
one85_db one85_db is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MattHiggins
I'm lost on that one. Help me out. I understand that silicone isn't conductive, but is motor conductive enough to be a concern in RC?
It simple, you just need to rember to wipe off your fingers before you mess with your electronics. Also if a shock breaks and spills/shoots motor oil into your electronics you may end up with a fried ESC or some thing like that...
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Old 12-27-2006, 12:07 AM
one85_db one85_db is offline
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I fried an ESC with motor oil by the way...
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Old 12-27-2006, 01:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by one85_db
I fried an ESC with motor oil by the way...
I have a savage x and the new radio box is almost completely waterproof.
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Old 12-27-2006, 05:13 AM
one85_db one85_db is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FXstrongSide
I have a savage x and the new radio box is almost completely waterproof.
Well if that is true then you should have nothing to worry about. The esc i fried was not waterproof.
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Old 12-27-2006, 09:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neon_Dave
^^

I've had no ill effects from using these types of things yet - basically I just go by this - if you can theoretically put some on your hand and it doesnt burn you or is toxic, it will work fine.

Dave
Uh, so I used battery acid and it hurt like heck, should I not use it?

For all the scientists out there, shocks use silicon oil for the fact that it is thicker than motor oil, isn't petroleum based and has a greater resistance to breakdown due to its shear properties. In other words, if you are trying to reinvent the wheel by going backwards and testing everything that didn't work for manufacturers, good luck and I hope it works for you. However, plan on the shocks leaking more, having fade earlier and being more of a mess to clean up when you are working with them. If you are just bashing, use the soap method and then you will have easier clean-ups because the detergent is already all over your vehicle.
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Old 12-27-2006, 01:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by one85_db
It simple, you just need to rember to wipe off your fingers before you mess with your electronics. Also if a shock breaks and spills/shoots motor oil into your electronics you may end up with a fried ESC or some thing like that...
That seems reasonable enough. I believe I need to bust out the multimeter and test the conductivity of some motor oil.


The bottom line, in my opinion, is that, of course, silicone fluid is best, but motor oil will work just fine. This is for bashing. For racing, get the right stuff.
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Old 12-27-2006, 02:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MattHiggins
The bottom line, in my opinion, is that, of course, silicone fluid is best, but motor oil will work just fine. This is for bashing. For racing, get the right stuff.
Right On.

Quote:
Uh, so I used battery acid and it hurt like heck, should I not use it?
Correct You should also stay away from using nitro fuel, alcohol, lime-away, liquid perfumes, etc.

I think you may have misunderstood what I meant. What I was trying to say was that for a temporary, simple solution, you have the alternative of other "feasable" household liquids...
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Old 12-27-2006, 03:41 PM
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I didn't misunderstand. It is actually easier to read the labels rather than hold it in your hand, but I believe that all you were trying to say was that if you thought it was safe for your hands, it would be safe for the shocks. I just wanted to have my smart a$$ comment for the day. Sorry if you thought I was serious.
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Old 12-27-2006, 04:00 PM
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Ok guys theres somethin far cheaper and far more like shock oil...Vegitable oil!
i used to use the stuff for my truck becaus i found myself going through 3 bottles of the stuff for each rebuild (8x large shocks...lots of oil)

the reason people dont use motor oil (at least i think it is motor oil) is someone told me that it doesnt compress as well and so it will cause the shocks to explode if they are under too much preassure so you have to allow a small ammount of air in with them to be safe.
Vegetable oil on the other hand works a charm! (what is it about 50c per litre?) lots of shocks...filled for that much...may piss ur mum off a lil tho
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Old 12-27-2006, 05:07 PM
awnelson awnelson is offline
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NEWS FLASH... oils heat up and the viscosity thins out and they attract air bubbles. I know you guys are saving tons of money, like maybe $10, but performance is affected. Silicon oil will be more consistent at all temps than other oils; the 5W, 10W, 15W means something on the bottle. It is a thinning agent to allow oil to flow at lower temps. Most o-rings cannot handle petroleum based oils and will swell and cause premature wear as well as poor rebound and absorption rates. If you want to do this, Tamiya and Kyosho would love to sell you friction dampers that you can just pack with grease because that is all you are acheiving with this tomfoolery.
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