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  #1  
Old 07-14-2005, 01:15 AM
resedaguy resedaguy is offline
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RTF park flyer for beginner

I been looking for a quality parkflyer that is good for a beginner. I'm looking for somthing that won't break everytime I fly it. My first $30 doller (yellow bee) has broken wings almost every flight! I did re-inforce the wings with clear packing tape which seemed to help. But I want somthing more controlable and realistic. I'll spend up to 200 for a quality plane.

The main concern is Quaity not price..

I have checked out the Multiplex Easystar RTF, but everybody seems to be out of stock!!

Any other suggestions? or should I wait for it to get stocked in stores again??
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  #2  
Old 07-14-2005, 06:29 AM
CrashParkFlyer CrashParkFlyer is offline
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Beginner plane

Well, I think the answer to your question will depend on who you ask. With this in mind, all I can do is give you my experience. My wife bought me a Firebird Commander (Hobbyzone) for Christmas. I had NEVER flown an RC plane in my life. The learning curve was steep - but short. I flew on my own, as I had nobody to teach me. I crashed a few times, replaced the wing, fell into all the usual pitfalls, replaced the tail. I devoured all the advice from people on this forum - invaluable! Now, I can throw the poor old battle weary Commander around the sky with complete confidence and have a blast - it's what this hobby is all about. Before I start to sound like a Hobbyzone sales rep, let me say this: The Commander has it's limitations (and also it's good points), but you know what I like about it? It never pretends to be anything it is not. It taught me to fly. I'm just about ready to move on from it now, onto a 3 channel plane, but I don't think I could have achieved this without the experience of flying the 2 channel Commander. It can take a crash quite well, is very repairable, parts are very available and reasonably priced. All in all, I think its a good beginner plane. Plenty of more experienced flyers may point you to this plane or that plane, and you will have to make your mind up which advice you take. As I said at the start - I can only give you my experience. If you have a good LHS, be guided by their advice also. Good luck, let us all know how you get on.
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  #3  
Old 07-14-2005, 11:00 AM
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Piggy89373 Piggy89373 is offline
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I can only reiterate Crash's experience. I recently bought one after wanting to try the sky instead of focusing on cars. I also started with the Commander. Right out of the box I flew. Stupidity on my part led to quite a few crashes and a good bit of packing tape and zip ties. It's ugly as hell now, but still flies quite well. Once I got into an open area large enough to accomodate my newby flying abilities, it was a whole different world of enjoyment.

I've since added the Challenger, and have nothing but great things to say about it. Despite my initial failings with it, I'd happily recommend it to others. I flew my rebuilt Challenger for the first time this past weekend. I've since flown every evening and putting in a good 20 plus hours of flight. It's an awesome plane and incredibly durable. I've gotten more than my bang for the buck out of it and still enjoying it.

However, the bottom line everybody has to consider when getting any RC is the support from your lhs. With few exceptions, stick with something your lhs supports. It's easier to come to them for advice, assistance, and spare parts if they carry that product.
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Old 07-14-2005, 08:40 PM
Walks Walks is offline
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I also have a Challenger as well as an Extreme (tho started with the Challenger per the hobby shop recommendation) and the only thing I can add to what Piggy and Crash said is how much do you want to pay for fixing your plane up. Extreme wings are $20 and tail wings $15. Challenger wings are $15 and tail wings $10. I'm not sure how much the Commander wings are but I'm sure there less than the Challenger's. Bottom line is even if you can fix your wings to a point you will break and need to replace them while learning. I sort of wish I started with the Commander myself. I think I would have spent less for the plane than I did on wings with just the Challenger. Might have been cheaper to learn. The down side is the lighter the plane the less wind you need to fly.

I do not by any means recommend starting with the Extreme. Once you fly one of the other birds you can move up to it quickly or on to other type of park flyer.

Good luck!

Walks
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  #5  
Old 07-15-2005, 03:41 AM
aeajr aeajr is offline
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READY TO FLY STARTER PLANES - Electric Parkflyers
No building - they practically fly right out of the box
These also glide well so you can thermal soar
with them under the right conditions.


Slow-V from Parkzone - $140 - Space CL2/3
Best flown in still to under 5 mph breeze. This is the best choice for people
who only have a small space to fly or who have an indoor place to fly, such as
a gym or
similar space.
http://h1071118.hobbyshopnow.com/pro...p?prod=PKZ1300
Discussion Thread
http://www.rcuniverse.com/forum/m_20...tm.htm#2089493
Video
http://users.cwnet.com/dhsc19/Slo_V_Aerobatics.wmv
Night fly module on a Slo-V
http://rc-galaxy.com/messageboard/mb...ViewMsg&num=-8


T-Hawk - RTF - Excellent Value - $170 - space CL1
Comes with extra wing, tail and battery
Flies well and stands up to hard landings
Can be flown on 27 MHz or 72 MHz
http://www.toytx.com/thawk3chrtf.html
T-Hawk - Without Radio - add your radio and receiver
http://www.readytoflyfun.com/wittran.html
T-Hawk Discussion Thread
http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showt...ighlight=THawk
Videos
http://www.readytoflyfun.com/thawkvideos.html


Easy Star - RTF - $180 - Space CL1
Believe this goes easily back in the box to keep in the car
Super tough foam. Comes with 72 MHz radio in the US.
Good parkflyer and a good glider
Radio in RTF package can be used to fly other planes
http://www.hobbypeople.net/gallery/240025.asp
Easy Star - ARF - Add you own radio gear
http://www.hobbypeople.net/gallery/240009.asp
Discussion Thread on Easy Star
http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=258656
Video - touch and gos
http://plawner.org/video/easygo.wmv
Video - Testing the plane's behavior
http://plawner.org/video/easystar.wmv


Aerobird Challenger - RTF Electric - $150 - Space CL1
Great keep in the car plane - take off the wing and it goes back in the box!
I started on an Aerobird RTF. I have over 350 flights on my Aerobirds. I
also thermal
and slope soar this plane. Flies well and stands up to hard landings. Their
add on fun accessories for night flying, air to air combat and drop module add
to the fun!
http://horizon.hobbyshopnow.com/prod...p?prod=HBZ3500
Review
http://www.hobbyzonesports.com/Disco...ID=1289#Page01
Discussion Thread
http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=147621
Video
http://www.parkflyers.com/html/aerobird_video.html
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  #6  
Old 07-15-2005, 03:41 AM
aeajr aeajr is offline
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Cool

Whether you have a coach or you are trying to learn to fly on your own, you
will need to be mindful of these six areas if you are going to become a
successful RC pilot. After two years of working with new flyers at our club,
and coaching flyers on the forums, there are a few things I have seen as the
key areas to stress for new pilots. Some get it right away and some have to
work at it. They are in no particular order because they all have to be
learned to be successful.

WIND
Orientation
Speed
Altitude
Over Control
Preflight Check

1) Wind - The single biggest cause of crashes that I have observed has been
the
insistence upon flying in too much wind. If you are under an instructor's
control or on a buddy box, then follow their advice, but if you are starting
out and tying to learn on your own, regardless of the model, I recommend dead
calm to 3 MPH for the slow stick and tiger moth type planes. Under 5 MPH for
all others. That includes gusts. An experienced pilot can handle more. It
is the pilot, more than the plane, that determines how much wind can be
handled.

The wind was around 10 mph steady with gusts to 12. That was strong enough
that some of the experienced pilots flying three and four channel small
electric planes chose not to launch their electrics. This new flyer insisted
that he wanted to try his two and three channel parkflyers. Crash, Crash,
Crash - Three planes in pieces. He just would not listen. Sometimes you just
have to let them crash. There is no other way to get them to understand.

Many parkflyers can be flown in higher winds by AN EXPERIENCED PILOT. I
have flown my Aerobird in 18 mph wind (clocked speed) but it is quite exciting
trying to land it.

Always keep the plane up wind from you. There is no reason for a new flyer to
have the plane downwind EVER!


2) Orientation - Knowing the orientation of your plane is a real challenge,
even for experienced pilots. You just have to work at it and some adults have
a real problem with left and right regardless of which way the plane is going.
Licensed pilots have a lot of trouble with this one as they are accustomed to
being in the plane.

Here are two suggestions on how to work on orientation when you are not
flying.

Use a flight simulator on your PC. Pick a slow flying model and fly it a lot.
Forget the jets and fast planes. Pick a slow one. Focus on left and right
coming at you. Keep the plane in front of you. Don't let it fly over your
head.

FMS is a free flight simulator. It is not the best flight sim, but the price
is right and it works. There are also other free and commercial simulators.

FMS Flight simulator Home Page
Free download
http://n.ethz.ch/student/mmoeller/fms/index_e.html

Parkflyers for FMS
http://gunnerson.homestead.com/files/fms_models.htm

The links below take you to sites that provide cables that work with FMS. If
your radio has a trainer port, these cables allow you to use the trainer port
on your radio to "fly" the
simulator. This is an excellent training approach.

http://www.mattclement.freeservers.com/fms/fms.html
http://www.simblaster.com/
http://www.customelectronics.co.uk/

An alternative is to try an RC car that has proportional steering. You don't
have to worry about lift, stall and wind. Get something with left and right
steering and speed control. Set up an easy course that goes toward and away
from you with lots of turns. Do it very slowly at first until you can make
the turns easily. Then build speed over time. You'll get it! If it has
sticks rather than a steering wheel even better, but not required. Oh, and
little cars are fun too.


3) Too much speed - Speed it the enemy of the new pilot but if you fly too
slowly the wings can't generate enough lift, so there is a compromise here.
The key message is that you don't have to fly at full throttle all the time.
Most small electrics fly very nicely at 2/3 throttle and some do quite well at
1/2. That is a much better training speed than full power. Launch at full
power and climb to a good height, say 100 feet as a minimum, so you have time
to recover from a mistake. At 100 feet, about double the height of the trees
where I live, go to half throttle and see how the plane handles. If it holds
altitude on a straight line, this is a good speed. Now work on slow and easy
turns, work on left and right, flying toward you and maintaining altitude.
Add a little throttle if the plane can't hold altitude.


4) Not enough altitude - New flyers are often afraid of altitude. They feel
safer close to the ground. Nothing could be more wrong.

Altitude is your friend. Altitude is your safety margin. It gives you a
chance to fix a mistake. If you are flying low and you make a mistake ....
CRUNCH!

As stated above I consider 100 feet, about double tree height where I live, as
a good flying height and I usually fly much higher than this. I advise my new
flyers that fifty feet, is minimum flying height. Below that you better be
lining up for landing.


5) Over control - Most of the time the plane does not need input from you.
Once you get to height, a properly trimmed plane flying in calm air will
maintain its height and direction with no help from you. In fact anything you
do will interfere with the plane.

When teaching new pilots I often do a demo flight of their plane. I get the
plane to 100 feet, then bring the throttle back to a nice cursing speed. I
get it going straight, with plenty of space in front of it, then take my hand
off the sticks and hold the radio out to the left with my arms spread wide to
emphasize that I am doing nothing. I let the plane go wherever it wants to
go, as long as it is holding altitude, staying upwind and has enough room. If
you are flying a high wing trainer and you can't do this, your plane is out of
trim.

Even in a mild breeze with some gusts, once you reach flying height, you
should be able to take your hand off the stick. Oh the plane will move around
and the breeze might push it into a turn, but it should continue to fly with
no help from you.

Along this same line of thinking, don't hold your turns for more than a couple
of seconds after the plane starts to turn. Understand that the plane turns by
banking or tilting its wings. If you hold a turn too long you will force the
plane to deepen this bank and it will eventually lose lift and go into a
spiral dive and crash. Give your inputs slowly and gently and watch the
plane. Start your turn then let off then turn some more and let off. Start
your turns long before you need to and you won't need to make sharp turns.

I just watch these guys hold the turn, hold the turn, hold the turn, crash.
Of course they are flying in 10 mph wind, near the ground, coming toward
themselves at full throttle.

6) Preflight check - Before every flight it is the pilot's responsibility to
confirm that the plane, the controls and the conditions are correct and
acceptable for flight.

Plane - Batteries at proper power
Surfaces properly aligned
No damage or breakage on the plane
Everything secure

Radio - Frequency control has been met before you turn on the radio
A full range check before the first flight of the day
All trims and switches in the proper position for this plane
Battery condition is good
Antenna fully extended
For computer radios - proper model is displayed
All surfaces move in the proper direction

Conditions - No one on the field or in any way at risk from your fight
You are launching into the wind
Wind strength is acceptable ( see wind above )
Sunglasses and a hat to protect your eyes
All other area conditions are acceptable.

Then and only then can you consider yourself, your plane, radio and the
conditions right for flight. Based on your plane, your radio and local
conditions you may need to add or change something here, but this is the bare
minimum. It only takes a couple of minutes at the beginning of the flying
day and only a few seconds to perform before each flight.

If this all seems like too much to remember, do what professional pilots do,
take along a preflight check list. Before every flight they go down
the check list, perform the tests, in sequence, and confirm that all is right.
If you want your flying experience to be a positive one, you should do the
same. After a short time, it all becomes automatic and just a natural part of
a fun and rewarding day.

I hope some of this is useful in learning to fly your plane.
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  #7  
Old 08-12-2005, 08:03 AM
JJFlash JJFlash is offline
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I learned on a begin-air 4 chnl plane. After several bad crashes and patching up with out buying parts I am still flying it without crashing. I like the plane very much but am looking for something that will fly longer on one charge.

JJ
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Old 08-12-2005, 11:37 AM
ginnz ginnz is offline
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i got the 4 channel cessna 182 from art-tech.

its an awesome plane. you can discinnect the servo and tape the ailerons for 3 channel flight. then goto 4 channel later.

i paid 280 (canadian-thats like 6 dollars american ;-))for the plane, 2 standard batterys and one lipo/w charger, 3 extra props....

sure beats the crap outta my scout!
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Old 08-14-2005, 06:42 PM
Norm1968 Norm1968 is offline
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Check out the Mountain Models Magpie and in particular their kit that has both the Slow Flyer wing and Sport Wing that has ailerons for when your ready to step up to the next level of training. You can check them out at;

www.mountainmodels.com
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  #10  
Old 08-15-2005, 06:32 AM
aeajr aeajr is offline
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Cool

Quote:
Originally Posted by resedaguy
I been looking for a quality parkflyer that is good for a beginner. I'm looking for somthing that won't break everytime I fly it. My first $30 doller (yellow bee) has broken wings almost every flight! I did re-inforce the wings with clear packing tape which seemed to help. But I want somthing more controlable and realistic. I'll spend up to 200 for a quality plane.
So, how are we doing? Have you selected a plane yet?
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  #11  
Old 09-05-2005, 06:31 PM
teamlosi2004 teamlosi2004 is offline
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Get Easy star.. I crashed 7 times in a row (Hard crash). Nothing broke!!! it just got dirty lol.. Anyways, I learned how to fly in a day !
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Old 09-10-2005, 02:05 AM
floss floss is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by resedaguy
I been looking for a quality parkflyer that is good for a beginner. I'm looking for somthing that won't break everytime I fly it. My first $30 doller (yellow bee) has broken wings almost every flight! I did re-inforce the wings with clear packing tape which seemed to help. But I want somthing more controlable and realistic. I'll spend up to 200 for a quality plane.

The main concern is Quaity not price..

I have checked out the Multiplex Easystar RTF, but everybody seems to be out of stock!!

Any other suggestions? or should I wait for it to get stocked in stores again??
Hi there, I taught myself to fly with a wattage mini-max. The first flight ended in a tree and it took 4 hours to retrieve it but I learnt alot about flying around obstacles. I recently got a SIG MFG Jenny, this is even more stable and predictable then the mini-max. I reckon bi-planes are the way for beginners, nice slow flight with all that wing area.
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